Understanding Rohingya Crisis

By late February 2020, the international community continues working in close cooperation with the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), where they together provide assistance to over 900,000 Rohingya living in Cox’s Bazar District, Bangladesh, together with over 300,000 local host Bangladeshis. The majority of the Rohingya live in 27 camps and settlements across the southern part of Cox’s Bazar District, the largest conglomeration of which (Kutupalong) houses over 600,000 individuals. TorqAid produces a monthly update (latest March 2020) of the Summary Sheet ‘Understanding the Rohingya Crisis’ (see below) which highlights key progress on this complex humanitarian operation.

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TorqAid also produces a summary on the series of ‘What Matters?’ humanitarian bulletins (see below), produced by the skilled Communication with Communities (CwC) team of practitioners working out of Cox’s Bazar. This regular buletin, produced in both Bangla (Bengali) and English, summarises key issues of concern and feedback from both Rohingya refugees and Bangladeshi host communities. Follow a link below to the March 2020 summary.

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Chris spent three months in Cox’s Bazar in mid 2018, where he worked as a RedR deployee attached to UNDP.

 

 

 

Bushfires

The Australian 2019/2020 bushfire season has been unprecedented in its intensity and geographical spread. Chris is an experienced humanitarian practitioner, who has experience in bushfire recovery related work.  Note his relevant profile below:

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He also is currently in discussion with a number of potential clients which are actively involved in bushfire recovery initiatives.  Chris has prepared a 1.5 day workshop, which both focuses on the 2019/2020 bushfires, and also draws lessons from the past.  Contact him at pipercm@iprimus.com.au if you’d like a copy of this training program.

In January 2020, Chris completed an article on bushfires for the March 2020 edition of the Geography Teachers Association of Victoria’s (GTAV) quarterly ‘Interaction’ magazine.  This includes some suggested Classroom Activities for Secondary level students.  Read a copy of this article below.

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If educators wish to have jpeg copies of the GTAV branded Disaster Risk Management Cycle (DRMC) and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) diagrams for use with students, they should contact the GTAV Director of Projects, Mz Judy Mraz,  at dp@gtav.asn.au.  Note these diagrams are TorqAid copyright, but can be used freely by schools and other educational establishments.

Complementary to this article are extended versions of a bushfire-related Bibliography and Agency Directory. Follow the links below for these.

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Finally, Chris also has recently prepared a report on use of volunteers in the 2009-2011 Victorian bushfires and floods.   Contact him at pipercm@iprimus.com.au if you’d like a copy of this.

Finally (!!), there are a couple of other related articles which might be of interest to educators and DRM practitioners, namely the TorqAid DRM Diagrammatic Framework, and TorqAid Toolkit.  These can be accessed in the following links:

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DRM-Framework

Over the past 19 years or so, TorqAid has worked with its students to develop a diagrammatic framework of key diagrams, which together describe key aspects of all disasters. This is called a ‘Disaster Risk Management (DRM) Diagrammatic Framework’. This article (February 2020 version), which is updated monthly, can be found here.

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There is some key information here for the Global Humanitarian Practitioner. This includes:

  • Four key TorqAid diagrams, namely the Disaster Risk Management Cycle (DRMC); the Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) diagram; the DRM Planning diagram; and the Project Management Cycle (PMC).
  • There are two versions of both the DRMC and DRR, one relating to sudden onset hazards/potential disasters (eg earthquakes, cyclones, bushes), and the other to slow-onset varieties (such as drought or climate change).  Jpeg versions of the 2020 editions of all these diagrams can be found on www.torqaid.com/resources
  • There is also a short paragraph on postulated ‘Theory of Change’ for each of these four diagrams (see pages 4, 7, 10 and 19)
  • There is a compact, but compehensive, section on Risk (see pages 11-17), including comments on Risk, Hazards, Vulnerability, Capacity, Resilience, the ISO 31000 risk management framework, Risk Matrix, and Risk Management Table
  • Finally there are a couple of pages (pages 22-24) on suggested Humanitarian Evaluation Criteria (HEC)

The DRM framework, and particularly the Emergency Response and Recovery Stages of the DRMC, as well as the DRR diagram, together form the basis for the article on the 2019/2020 Australian bushfires, prepared by Chris, for the Geography Teacher’s Association of Victoria’s (GTAV) March 2020 edition of their quaterly magazine ‘Interaction’.  Press here for the latest copy of this article.

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