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  • in reply to: DRM Module 1: Exercise 1.10: Funding Issues #1010
    Keymaster

    It’ll be interesting to see whether funding commitments increase should the latest ‘peace agreement; hold (mid-Sept 2016)

    in reply to: DRM Module 1: Exercise 1.10: Funding Issues #1009
    Keymaster

    It’ll be interesting to see whether funding commitments increase should the latest ‘peace agreement; hold (mid-Sept 2016)

    in reply to: DRM Module 1: Exercise 1.10: Funding Issues #1008
    Keymaster

    It’ll be interesting to see whether funding commitments increase should the latest ‘peace agreement; hold (mid-Sept 2016)

    Keymaster

    You’ve raised an interesting question about the diagrams. For all of the key ones (DRMC x 2 versions; DRR x 2 versions; PMC; DRM Planning diagram), they’ve all been developed over the past 12 years or so, as an attempt to represent diagrammatically key aspects of DRM and project management. On one hand, they represent an ideal (indeed almost ultimate) participatory process…whilst I originally thought up the designs, they’ve been modified as a result mainly from DRM and PPM students. One example is the DRR diagram, where the suggestion for good governance being in a circle surrounded by those four other components, was suggested by a PNG student (actually working for a bank) in Port Moresby. The challenge is for the diagrams to develop more ‘traction’ and become increasingly widely accepted. Whilst these diagrams are incorporated in the Charles Sturt University (CSU) emergency management program I teach in, there’s still a long way to go. ultimately for any diagram, if it’s useful, keep it. If it’s no good, either modify it or discard it….

    Keymaster

    The ACAPS work is again the best I’ve seen on assessments. Catherine, within the Pacific, as far as you may know, is there are coordination of assessment tools from different countries/islands (eg Fiji/Vanuatu/Tonga/Samoa) for the food security sector you are involved in ? If so, I would presume FAO plays a role in this…s

    Keymaster

    Some more interesting points here. Building up of back-up supplies is always somewhat controversial, and again there is a question of balance here. There are large warehouses used by the UN around the world, and these can draw down on supplies at relatively short notice. The Australian government also has a relief warehouse in Brisbane, with material which can be flown out at short notice to the Pacific. So it’s good to have some central warehouses such as these. If all major NGOS 9for example) tried to duplicate this, there potentially is a duplication of materials, with lots of expenditure on items which may be rarely used. ideally, these supplies should be accessed by locally purchased materials, as the latter contribute to the local economy. When I was working for ACOM in Luganville, Santo (in Vanuatu), one of our recommendations was to research into the likely relief supplies needed in the emergency response/early recovery stages of a disaster, which could be accessed from local large stores..eg things such as building materials, pumps, generators, shovels, tarpaulins, rope, plastic sheeting, cooking items, tinned or bagged food etc. Ideally simple contractual arrangements could be made with these stores, so that Items could be readily made accessible (with perhaps payment coming in afterwards). There is a role for the Chamber of Commerce to help expedite this..l .

    Keymaster

    There are some interesting comments here, both from Catharine and Michael B. These tend to highlight some of the complexities of actual policy making decisions. I remember reading an interview by an Australian government minister commenting on resources allocated to his department to deal with either the potential bird flu (or was it SARS ?) epidemic. He said, in effect, after receiving and spending a budget of S x ‘ If nothing happens, my department will be criticised for wasting all this money. If something does happen, I will be criticised for not asking for ten times the amount !). No east answers… ,

    Keymaster

    In practice, dealing with disasters is somewhat messy. In the emergency response and early recovery stages (particularly for medium to fast onset disasters), the momentum for initiatives usually keeps up as there has been the obvious disaster; media attention; and (hopefully) sufficient financial resources. As time moves on however, there is the danger that momentum and interest begins to wane. It was interesting that following the 2004 Indonesian tsunami in Indonesia, the host government there had both a start date of April 2005 for their (government-run) recovery program, organised through what they called the BRR, and an end date four years later (ie May 2009) for the official closure of this. I think this particular approach works well.
    Interestingly in Tonga, some of the coordination clusters I was involved in (in helping draw up terms of reference for), are currently meeting…this is encouraging, as these stakeholders are not only looking at emergency response/recovery initiatives, but increasingly at DRR ones as well. , ,

    Keymaster

    The diagram is able to illustrate the case that DRR reduces the impact of a potential disaster. It is more challenging to present an illustration of this type which demonstrates a diminishment of likelihood.

    Keymaster

    Some interesting comments here. Michael (Buckley) any thoughts, you also being a Medical Practitioner on this holistic approach ?

    Keymaster

    Catherine, any thoughts ?

    Keymaster

    The geography/topography of the Pacific islands is interesting, and can determine how they respond to particular natural disasters. Where there are small atolls, built on limestone cones coming out of the deep water, apparently these (almost illogically) when exposed to tsunamis, may not be hit by massive waves. This happened in the Maldives (west of Sri Lanka) during the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake/water. The fast tsunami waves (travelling at up to 500 kph in deep water) were only 1/2 metres went they swept thru’ these islands (ie there wasn’t time to slow down, and rise in height). In Tonga conversely (and particularly the main island), where this is primarily low-lying limestone (and no obvious mountains to seek refuge in), the earthquake/tsunami models predict massive destruction in the capital Nuku’alofa, as the waves would be slowed down by the land mass and rise in height (eg up to 5-10 metres). You’re correct, Matt, for other Pacific volcanic islands, where people can potentially flee to high ground if they either hear the earthquake (when relatively near), and are warned through the early warning networks (for earthquakes generates hundreds of kms away). It’s an interesting subject !

    Keymaster

    I agree with these points. I was thinking why the food security situation in parts of Africa sometimes appears to be worse than parts of Africa. Wondering if this is due to a combination of el Nino/la Nina situations tending to affect Africa relatively more than Asia/L.America (Catharine, your thoughts ?), and that there is relatively more serious conflict related situations certainly in parts of West Africa and Eastern Africa (eg currently S.Sudan and Somalia). Wondering whether the SE Asian monsoons seem to be relatively less affected by severe el Nino/la Nina fluctuations ?

    Keymaster

    Hi Matt, just been thinking thru’ what you’ve been saying here. You’re correct in that both models use common practices, just that in the slow-onset situation, because events are less dramatic, it’s often hard to get stakeholders involved in carrying out emergency response (let along DRR) or recovery initiatives. Catharine highlighted the challenge of responding to the 2016 el Nino drought which started ‘biting’ around August last year. The FEWS Net website also highlights that these people are right on top of the food security situation (and can predict food situation scenarios five months ahead)…the challenge is getting stakeholders to respond in a timely manner.

    Keymaster

    Hi Matt, just been thinking thru’ what you’ve been saying here. You’re correct in that both models use common practices, just that in the slow-onset situation, because events are less dramatic, it’s often hard to get stakeholders involved in carrying out emergency response (let along DRR) or recovery initiatives. Catharine highlighted the challenge of responding to the 2016 el Nino drought which started ‘biting’ around August last year. The FEWS Net website also highlights that these people are right on top of the food security situation (and can predict food situation scenarios five months ahead)…the challenge is getting stakeholders to respond in a timely manner.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 100 total)